AAMI, FDA to Hold Summit on Healthcare Technology in Home Healthcare, Other Nonclinical Settings

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As healthcare facilities look to save money, and patients rely increasingly on mobile devices to monitor their conditions, technology is moving out of hospitals and into homes and other nonclinical settings—a trend known as distributed care. But while patients and hospitals see the benefits of this trend in terms of convenience and reduced costs, there are also risks and challenges to consider as more technology moves into the hands of nonmedical professionals.

As healthcare facilities look to save money, and patients rely increasingly on mobile devices to monitor their conditions, technology is moving out of hospitals and into homes and other nonclinical settings—a trend known as distributed care.

The summit is geared toward a range of stakeholders, including clinical engineers, medical device manufacturers, information technology experts, nurses, doctors, regulators, academics, and other healthcare technology management professionals. Attendees will hear presentations from experts and discuss priorities and potential solutions for the risks surrounding the move of care to nonclinical settings.

There are several factors at work behind the distributed care trend. Members of the large Baby Boom Generation are requiring more health services as they age. At the same time, healthcare facilities are under enormous pressure to reduce costs, including through limiting hospital stays.

Finally, evolving mobile and wireless technologies have opened up a new world in terms of what kind of devices can be introduced in nonclinical settings.  While these devices hold great promise for improving patient care, manufacturers must be mindful of the fact that their technologies are being used by nonclinicians.

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